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Our Business

Our Commitment

Elements of principles and designs

Components of the design

Color and balance

Materials








Our Commitment

We are committed to providing uniquely distinctive floral arrangements, designed and crafted for individuals looking for custom made decorations.  Each piece is created by hand, beginning with interesting containers, adding pleasing colored flowers, complimentary ribbons, and greenery.  The end result is exceptionally beautiful decorations that can be used in the home or office throughout the year or can be given as gift for special occasions.

Winsome Gifts' artistic designers create all their floral pieces in our own studio. Much time and thought goes into each and every creation lending individuality as well as splendor to the item.

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Elements of principles and designs*

The term flower arrangement presupposes the word design. When flowers are placed in containers without thought of design, they remain a bunch of flowers, beautiful in themselves but not making up an arrangement. Line, form, color, and texture are the basic design elements that are selected, then composed into a harmonious unit based on the principles of design--balance, contrast, rhythm, scale, proportion, harmony, and dominance. Line is provided by branches or slender, steeple-like flowers such as snapdragon, delphinium, and stock. Form and color are as varied as the plant world itself. Moreover, forms not natural to the plant world can be created for contemporary abstract compositions by bending and manipulating branches, vines, or reeds to enclose space and create new shapes. Texture describes surface quality and can be coarse, as in many-petaled surfaces such as chrysanthemums, or smooth, as in anthuriums, calla lilies, and gladioli. There are many variations between these extremes. Leaves and woody stems also have varied textural qualities.

A flower arrangement includes not only the flowers themselves but the container that holds them and the base on which the container may rest. If an accessory, such as a doily, is included, that too becomes a part of the total design.

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Components of the design

As the components of a design are selected and combined, a silhouette, or arrangement outline, is created. This outline is generally considered most interesting when the spaces in the composition vary in size and shape. Third dimension, or sculptural quality, is accomplished by allowing some of the plant materials in a grouping to extend forward and others to recede. Flower heads turned sideways, or toward the back, for example, break up contour uniformity and draw the eye into and around the composition. When a formal, static quality is sought, the contour is restricted or evenly shaped, often into such graduated forms as a pyramid or mound.

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Color and balance

Balance is psychologically important. Color as well as the actual size of the plant material influences design stability. Dark color values look heavier than light values; a deep red rose, for example, appears heavier in an arrangement than a pale pink carnation, even though they are the same size. An arrangement in which dark colors are massed at the top and light colors at the bottom can therefore appear top-heavy. Similar flowers placed in identical positions on either side of an imaginary vertical axis create symmetrical balance. If there is an unequal distribution of varying flowers and leaves on either side of the axis but their apparent visual weight is counterbalanced, asymmetrical balance is achieved. This compositional device is more subtle and often more pleasing aesthetically than symmetrical balance, for its effect is less apparently contrived and more varied. Contrasts of light and dark, rough and smooth, large and small, also give variety to the composition. An arrangement generally has a dominant area or center of visual interest to which the eye returns after examining all aspects of the arrangement. An area of strong color intensity or very light values, or a rather solid grouping of plant material along the imaginary axis and just above the container's rim, are devices commonly used as compositional centers. The rhythm of a dynamic, flowing line can be achieved by the graduated repetition of a particular shape, or by the combination of related color values. Scale indicates relationships: the sizes of plant materials must be suitably related to the size of the container and to each other. Proportion has to do with the organization of amounts and areas. Proportion also relates to the placement of the arrangement in a setting. Harmony is a sense of unity and belonging, one thing with another, that comes with the proper selection of all the components of an arrangement--color, shape, size, and texture of both plant materials and container.

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Materials

Many different kinds of plant materials are used in floral decorations, among them flowers, foliage, grasses, grains, branches, berries, cones, fruits, and vegetables. The materials may be living, dried, or artificial. Throughout history and in almost every conceivable medium man has created artificial plant materials. The Chinese fashioned peony blossoms and fruits from semiprecious stones and carved jade leaves, which they assembled into small trees.  For European royalty in the late 19th century, the Russian-born jeweler Peter Carl Faberge (1846-1920) designed exquisite single-stemmed flowers of gold, enamel, gems, and semiprecious stones set in small rock-crystal pots. During the 18th and 19th centuries,  the Royal Worcester, Crown Staffordshire, and Royal Doulton factories in England became world-famous for their highly realistic porcelain floral arrangements, which are still made. The Victorians developed a home craft of making and arranging flowers and fruits. Wax, cloth, yarn, feathers, shells, and seeds were used to make the flowers and fruits, which were then either framed or placed under glass domes. Because of their relatively low cost, durability, and easy maintenance (an occasional washing or dusting), plastic and silk flowers and plants are in such great demand that their production has become an important 20th-century industry.

Winsome Gifts uses  carefully selected high quality silk flowers and foliage to create unmatchable elegance and unforgettable designs.

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* - (inspired by http://www.britannica.com/premium/?source=RMOVSSBranded )

 

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 Last Modified December1, 2008 Winsome Gifts Webmaster 



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